Romeo and Juliet - "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" - Romeo and Juliet

 Romeo and Juliet Art         Romeo and Juliet


 
Script :
 
Romeo and Juliet
ACT 1 : PROLOGUE

ACT 1 : SCENE 1

ACT 1 : SCENE 2

ACT 1 : SCENE 3

ACT 1 : SCENE 4

ACT 1 : SCENE 5

ACT 2 : PROLOGUE

ACT 2 : SCENE 1

ACT 2 : SCENE 2

ACT 2 : SCENE 3

ACT 2 : SCENE 4

ACT 2 : SCENE 5

ACT 2 : SCENE 6

ACT 3 : SCENE 1

ACT 3 : SCENE 2

ACT 3 : SCENE 3

ACT 3 : SCENE 4

ACT 3 : SCENE 5

ACT 4 : SCENE 1

ACT 4 : SCENE 2

ACT 4 : SCENE 3

ACT 4 : SCENE 4

ACT 4 : SCENE 5

ACT 5 : SCENE 1

ACT 5 : SCENE 2

ACT 5 : SCENE 3

CHARACTERS

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Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
 

Quotations by Shakespeare.

Shakespeare Quotes - 8

O, beware, my lord, . . .

O, how this spring . . .

O, throw away the . . .

O, woe is me, . . .

Oft expectation fails, and . . .

Oh, that way madness . . .

Our bodies are our . . .

Our doubts are traitors . . .

Our doubts are traitors, . . .

Our doubts are traitors, . . .

Our life, exempt from . . .

Our remedies oft in . . .

Out, damned spot! out, . . .

Pity is the virtue . . .

Praising what is lost . . .

Pray you now, forget . . .

See first that the . . .

Silence is the perfectest . . .

Small cheer and great . . .

Small to greater matters . . .

So full of artless . . .

So may he rest, . . .

Some men never seem . . .

Some rise by sin, . . .

Something is rotten in . . .

Speak to me as . . .

Strong reasons make strong . . .

Suspicion always haunts the . . .

Suspicion always haunts the . . .

Sweet are the uses . . .

The attempt and not . . .

The course of TRUE . . .

The devil hath power . . .

The end crowns all, . . .

The fault, dear Brutus, . . .

The fool doth think . . .

The fringed curtains of . . .

The game is up. . . .

The gaudy, blabbing, and . . .

The gods are just, . . .

The hand that hath . . .

The law hath not . . .

The little foolery that . . .

The man that hath . . .

The more pity, that . . .

The peace of heaven . . .

The rest is silence. . . .

The road to TRUE . . .

The soul of this . . .

The trust I have . . .

The worst is not . . .

Their understanding Begins to . . .

There are more things . . .

There is a tide . . .

There is a tide . . .

There is nothing either . . .

There is occasions and . . .

There was a star . . .

They say, best men . . .

Things are neither good . . .

This above all: to . . .

This England never did, . . .

This is the short . . .

This is the third . . .

This royal throne of . . .

Those that are good . . .

Thou art all the . . .

Thou art the Mars . . .

Thou shalt be both . . .

Though inclination be as . . .

Thy words, I grant . . .

To thine own self . . .

To thine own self . . .

TRUE is it that . . .

Truth is truth To . . .

Virtue and genuine graces . . .

We burn daylight. . . .

We do not keep . . .

We have seen better . . .

We have some salt . . .

We know what we . . .

What a deformed thief . . .

What a piece of . . .

What seest thou else . . .

What seest thou else . . .

What the great ones . . .

When griping grief the . . .

When he is best, . . .

When my love swears . . .

When sorrows come, they . . .

When we are born, . . .

While thou livest keep . . .

Why then the worlds . . .

You cram these words . . .

Your face is a . . .

Your hearts are mighty, . . .

But then I sigh, . . .

Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art . . .

This above all to . . .

Oh, thou hast a . . .

Be not afraid of . . .

All the world's a . . .

To business that we . . .

Our doubts are traitors,And . . .

To die, to sleep . . .

Cowards die many times . . .

Angels and ministers of . . .

As flies to wanton . . .

Alas, poor Yorick I . . .

He was my friend, . . .

O for a muse . . .

There are more things . . .

Age cannot wither her, . . .

The quality of mercy . . .

For he today that . . .



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